Wee Trip to Scotland- Part 1

Stage 1

During the day are too many tou­rists the­re (for my tas­te) to make good pic­tures. Unfor­tu­n­a­te­ly I had on this trip no time to wait of the sun­set and the absence of peop­le. Here, the­re­fo­re, only a few impres­si­ons of the Cast­le and the sur­roun­ding coun­try­si­de, becau­se per­man­ent­ly tou­rists ran into my pic­tu­re or left color­ful dots in the Land­s­cape.

Eilean Donan Castle

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Eile­an Donan is reco­gnis­ed as one of the most ico­nic images of Scot­land all over the world. Situa­ted on an island at the point whe­re three gre­at sea lochs meet, and sur­roun­ded by some majes­tic sce­ne­ry, it is litt­le won­der that the cast­le is now one of the most visi­ted and important attrac­tions in the Scot­tish High­lands.

6th /​7th Cen­tu­ry
The name Eile­an Donan ‘Island of Donan’ esta­blished pro­bab­ly through use as a cha­pel site by Saint Don­n­an of Eigg.

12th /​13th Cen­tu­ry
First cast­le built on the island pos­si­b­ly by eit­her King Alex­an­der II or III to help streng­t­hen defen­ces against the Danes or by Far­quar II, Earl of Ross.

1715
Gar­r­i­son­ed by Government tro­ops but reta­ken by the Jaco­b­ites befo­re the batt­le of She­riff­muir.

1719
Occu­pied by Spa­nish sol­di­ers, part of a force of 300 who lan­ded on the west coast to sup­port the Jaco­b­ite upri­sing. Government fri­ga­tes respon­ded by bom­bar­ding the Cast­le and redu­cing it ruins. After­wards, the Cap­tain Herd­man of the Enter­pri­se went ashore to des­troy the powder maga­zi­ne – it explo­ded and des­troy­ed much of the remai­ning Cast­le.

1719 – 1911
The ruins lie aban­do­ned.

(Source http://​www​.eile​an​donan​cast​le​.com/​a​b​o​u​t​/​t​i​m​e​l​ine )

In 1984 it fea­tured in the movie High­lan­der with Chris­to­pher Lam­bert and Sean Con­ne­ry. Upstairs the­re are 3 b/​w pho­to­graphs taken of the set during filming. Other movies have fea­tured the cast­le (see below) sin­ce it is so pic­tures­que.

Eilean Donan Castle Ghosts

Spa­nish Sol­dier

During the Jaco­b­ite rebel­li­on, 46 Spa­nish sol­di­ers were sta­tio­ned here when the cast­le was atta­cked by several government boats, lea­ding ulti­mate­ly to their death and the cast­les’ dest­ruc­tion. One of the more well known ghosts of Eile­an Donan is belie­ved to be that of one of the sol­di­ers that died that day. His eerie appa­ri­ti­on has been seen often in the gift shop, clut­ching his head under­ne­ath his arm.

Lady Mary

The appa­ri­ti­on of Lady Mary has been wit­nessed many times in one of the bedrooms in the cast­le.

On the day are too many tou­rists the­re (for my tas­te) to make good pic­tures. Unfor­tu­n­a­te­ly I had on this trip no time to wait of the sun­set and the absence of peop­le. Here, the­re­fo­re, only a few impres­si­ons of the Cast­le and the sur­roun­ding coun­try­si­de, becau­se per­man­ent­ly tou­rists ran into my pic­tu­re or left color­ful dots in the Land­s­cape.

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Stage 2

We arri­ve at Loch Ness at 9:30 am and the­re was not much to see..it was very fog­gy and the­re whe­re not many good viewing Plat­forms on our Way…

Loch Ness

Loch Ness

Loch Ness is a lar­ge, deep, freshwa­ter loch in the Scot­tish High­lands exten­ding for appro­xi­mate­ly 23 miles (37 km) sou­thwest of Inver­ness. Its sur­face is 52 ft (16 m) above sea level. Loch Ness is best known for alle­ged sightings of the cryp­to­zoo­lo­gi­cal Loch Ness Mons­ter, also known affec­tio­na­te­ly as “Nes­sie”. It is con­nec­ted at the sou­thern end by the River Oich and a sec­tion of the Cale­do­ni­an Canal to Loch Oich. At the nort­hern end the­re is the BonaNar­rows which opens out into Loch Doch­four, which feeds the River Ness and a fur­t­her sec­tion of canal to Inver­ness. It is one of a series of inter­con­nec­ted, mur­ky bodies of water in Scot­land; its water visi­bi­li­ty is excep­tio­nal­ly low due to a high peat con­tent in the sur­roun­ding soil. Loch Ness is the second lar­gest Scot­tish loch by sur­face area at 22 sq mi (56 km2) after Loch Lomond, but due to its gre­at dep­th, it is the lar­gest by volu­me in the Bri­tish Isles.

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Urquhart Castle

Urquhart Cast­le is the most famous site in the area. The cast­le is in ruins but an impres­si­ve ruin with walls, four tur­rets and the keep. The beau­ty of the place cou­pled with its histo­ry makes it so attrac­tive. The posi­ti­on of the cast­le at Stro­ne Point is dra­ma­tic and com­man­ds a wide view of Loch Ness. The­re had been a for­t­ress at that point from anci­ent times and the cast­le was asso­cia­ted with big names of Scot­tish histo­ry such as Saint Colum­ba (6th cen­tu­ry) and Robert the Bruce (12 – 13th cen­tu­ry). The end came with a bang in the final years of the 17th cen­tu­ry when it was packed with explo­si­ves and blown up to ren­der it useless to the Jaco­b­ites.

Urquhart Castle

Stage 3

It was quit a View…one of the­se magic moments i love scot­land for..

Invermoriston Falls

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Inbhir Mhoireas­tain (in Gaelic) is a small vil­la­ge 7 miles north of Fort Augus­tus, High­land, Scot­land. The vil­la­ge is on theA82 road, at a junc­tion with the A887. The village’s most visi­ted attrac­tion is the Tho­mas Tel­ford bridge, built in 1813, which cros­ses the spec­ta­cu­lar River Moris­ton falls. This bridge used to form part of the main road bet­ween Drumnad­ro­chit and Fort Augus­tus but was repla­ced in the 1930s with the new bridge used today.The River Moriston’s name means ‘river of water­falls.

Thomas Telford Bridge

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River Moriston falls

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to be continued

Heike Ginger Ba Written by:

|Human|Woman|Mother|Wife|Friend| Photographer| Blogger| |TV-Junkie|Photoshop-Beginner|Art-Lover|Cologne-based|Outlander-addict |Sherlockian |TWD-devoted

2 Comments

  1. Diane Riddell
    May 28
    Reply

    All looks won­der­ful Hei­ke thank you for sharing this xx

    • Heike Ginger Ba
      May 28
      Reply

      Hi Dia­ne..
      thanks for your visit :)…glad you enjoy them as i do..

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